St Michael's Uniting Church
(formerly The Independent Church)
Collins Street, Melbourne

1866 Hill & Son, London (job no 1204);
2 manuals, 18 speaking stops, 3 couplers, tracker action
Gt: 8.8.8.4.4.2-2/3.2.III.8. Sw: 16.8.8.4.2.8.8. Ped: 16.8.

Rebuilt 1923, 1951 and 1958 Geo. Fincham & Sons.
3 manuals, 44 speaking stops, electro-pneumatic action
Gt: 16.8.8.8.4.4.4.2-2/3.2.2.III.8.4. Sw: 16.8.8.8.8.4.4.2.III.8.8.4.
Ch: 8.8.4.2-2/3.2.8.8. 8.4. Ped: 32.16.16.16.16.8.8.8.II.16.



Simon Colvin (May 2007)


© PdL 2006




Original 1866 Hill organ


The first St Michael’s organ, seen above, was built in 1866 by the famous London firm of Hill & Son (job no 1204). This modest two manual, mechanical action organ contained 18 speaking stops. The pipework and some of the wind chests from this organ have been the basis for the subsequent instruments.

By the 1920’s the original Hill organ was proving to be inadequate for the needs of the congregation and in need of some repair. The Melbourne company of George Fincham & Sons built a new instrument using some of the parts from the old organ in 1923.

This organ used the then popular tubular-pneumatic action system which enabled the organist to be seated at some distance from the organ pipes, and to have a lighter key touch.






1925

Shown above is the 1923 organ. The organ’s console can be seen beneath the pulpit. The 1923 Organ was rebuilt in 1951 and fitted with electro pneumatic action. This organ was opened by the prominent English organist and composer Eric Thiman. This organ proved to be of inadequate size to fulfil the needs of the church.

 



1958


The organ you see today was built in 1958 by George Fincham and Sons who also built the 1923 organ. The current organ is the work of George Bowring Fincham, grandson of the original George Fincham who started the company in 1864. The console was moved from its central location to its current position in 1878. And in 1979 the swell mixture stop was recast. The present organ has 3 manuals and pedals, 44 speaking stops and approximately 2225 speaking pipes. The keys and stop action are electro-pneumatic.

The Specification is as follows:

GREAT DIVISION
Double Open Diapason
Open Diapason No 1
Open Diapason No 2
Stopped Diapason
Octave
Principal
Wald Flute
Twelfth
Super Octave
Fifteenth
Mixture
Trumpet
Clarion
Swell to Great Sub Octave
Swell to Great
Swell to Great Super Octave
Choir to Great Sub Octave
Choir to Great
Choir to Great Super Octave

SWELL DIVISION
(Enclosed)
Bourdon
Open Diapason
Hohl Flute
Viol D’ Orchestra
Voix Celeste
Principal
Flauto Traverso
Fifteenth
Mixture
Cornopean
Oboe
Clarion
Swell Sub Octave
Swell Unison Off
Swell Octave
Tremulant

CHOIR ORGAN
(Enclosed)
Rohr Gedact
Dulciana
Lieblich Flute
Nazard
Harmonic Piccolo
Clarinet
Orchestral Oboe
Trumpet
Clarion
Choir Sub Octave
Choir Unison Off
Choir Octave
Swell to Choir
Tremulant

PEDAL DIVISION

Sub Bourdon
Open Diapason Wood
Open Diapason Metal
Sub Bass
Echo Bourdon
Octave
Cello
Bass Flute
Quartane
Trombone
Great to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Choir to Pedal

16
8
8
8
4
4
4
2-2/3
2
2
III
8
4








16
8
8
8
8
4
4
2
III
8
8
4






8
8
4
2-2/3
2
8
8
8
4







32
16
16
16
16
8
8
8
II
16



3-½" wind pressure

6" wind pressure


6" wind pressure



6" wind pressure


6" wind pressure
6" wind pressure







5" wind pressure

















4" wind pressure







6" wind pressure
6" wind pressure






3-½" wind pressure









6" wind pressure








 


© PdL 2006



Simon Colvin (May 2007)


from the Australasian Sketcher

Historic photos supplied by Rhys Boak (organist 2007)
Information on the organ provided by Rhys Boak from a pamphlet the church has produced on the organ (Oct. 2008)