Workshop of Mark Fisher (Pipe Organ Reconstructions Pty Ltd), Sydney

Henry Bevington & Sons. London, 1905, for Holy Trinity Church, Milford, Derbyshire, UK.

2 manuals, 17 speaking stops, 4 couplers, mechanical action (pneumatic action on pedals)

 



[Photograph from Rodney Tomkins, Pipe Organs in Churches and Chapels of the
Derbyshire Derwent and Ecclesbourne Valleys
(Scarthin Books, 1995)]



This organ was built in 1905 by Bevington & Sons of London for Holy Trinity Church, Milford, and installed in a new purpose-built chamber to the north of the chancel. The two arched openings were fronted with attractive twin Gothic cases.

For all its size, though, the instrument suffered from two major handicaps: the sound did not get out into the nave, and the tracker mechanism was quite the heaviest imaginable – both of which things were a pity, since the pipework was good and would certainly have benefited from improved action and location.

GREAT
Open Diapason
Violin Diapason
Dulciana
Flauto Traverso
Principal
Lieblich Flöte
Fifteenth

SWELL
Open Diapason
Stop'd Diapason
Salicional
Voix Celeste
Principal
Mixture
Cornopean
Oboe

PEDAL
Bourdon
Flute Bass

COUPLERS
Swell to Pedal
Great to Pedal
Swell to Great
Swell Sub Octave

8
8
8
8
4
4
2


8
8
8
8
4
3 rks
8
8


16
8






     

Compass: 56/30
Action: Mechanical (manuals); pneumatic (pedals)

In 1994 the decision was taken, on account of the above-mentioned handicaps and the cost of eliminating them, to install another organ.1

The organ was acquired by Mark Fisher of Sydney in 1996, who has already undertaken much restoration work on the instrument. The double-rise bellows, manual windchests, keyboards, pedalboard, stop action, building frame and swell box have already been restored. The pipework was damaged in transit, and will require considerable repair work. The original decorative casework can be supplied with the organ.2

_____________________________________________________________________

1 Details from Rodney Tomkins, Pipe Organs in Churches and Chapels of the Derbyshire Derwent and Ecclesbourne Valleys, from Darley Abbey to Darley Dale (Scarthin Books, 1995), p. 44.

2 Information supplied by Mark Fisher, October 2016.